Broadcasting Satellite System Corporation (B-Sat)

 

The Broadcasting Satellite System Corporation (BSAT) is a unique operator of broadcasting satellites in 12GHz BSS band in Japan. The company was established in April 1993 and is located in Tokyo, Japan. Since then, B-SAT has worked toward providing stable satellite operations and continuity of broadcast services. B-SAT currently owns and manages four satellites: BSAT-3a for both analogue and digital services, BSAT-2a for analog services, BSAT-2c for digital services, and BSAT-1b for a backup satellite. Its largest stockholder, owning 49.9%, is NHK, the Japan Broadcasting Corporation. In 1994 the company was ranked by Space News as world's 19th largest fixed satellite operator.



History


The company was established in April 1993 and in June 1994 B-sat signed a contract with Hughes (Boeing CSS) to build and launch the BSAT-1 Satellite. The built would take 3 years.

In April 1997 the company completed the built of the Kawaghuchi and Kimitsu Satellite control Centers before the BSAT-1 Satellite was launched that same year by Arianespace.

In August 1997 the BSAT-1A Satellite was put in operation.

Following that year, in July 1998, the BSAT-1B Satellite was successfully launched by Arianespace. The BSAT-1B Satellite was a back-up satellite.

In July 1998 BSAT received a preliminary license from the Ministry of Posts & Telecommunications for Digital broadcasting services using the BSAT-2 satellite. That same year the BSAT-1b Satellite was delivered from Hughes (Boeing CSS) and was put in operation on August 1st, 1998.

In March ’99 BSAT signed a contract with Orbital Science Corp. (Orbital ATK, Inc.) for the built and launch the BSAT-2 Satellite. In January 2000 the spacecraft was commissioned by the Hi-Vision Association to transmit engineering streams and began deploying support systems. In that same year, in November the BS digital broadcast Uplink Center was completed.

In December 2000 the BS digital broadcasting services using the BSAT-1b back-up Satellite was commercialized using a temporary license due to the delay of the BSAT-2a Satellite.

The BSAT-2a Satellite was successfully launched by Arianespace in March 2001. The BS digital broadcasting services from the BSAT-1b were transferred to BSAT-2a in April that same year.

In July 2001 the BSAT-2b Satellite was launched by Arianespace but the positioning of the satellite in a proper orbit failed.

In October 2001 BSAT contracted Orbital Science Corp. (Orbital ATK, Inc.) to built and launch the BSAT-2c Satellite to back up BSAT-2b that was successfully launched in June 2003 and began operations in July that same year.

In June 2004 BSAT received a preliminary license for the BS broadcasting services using BSAT-3a (to replace BSAT-1a and BSAT-1b) spacecraft from ministry of Public Management, Home Affairs, Posts and Telecommunications.

In May 2005 Lockheed Martin was contracted to build and launch the BSAT-3a Satellite that was successfully launched on an Ariane rocket in August 2007. The spacecraft was put into operation in November 2007. Also this year the company received a preliminary license for the BS broadcasting services using BSAT-3b & BSAT-3c (the successor of BSAT-2) spacecraft from ministry of Public Management, Home Affairs, Posts and Telecommunications.

In April 2008 Lockheed Martin was contracted again to build and launch the BSAT-3b Satellite that was launched by Arianespace aboard an Ariane 5-ECA along with the Eutelsat W3B satellite on Oct 28th 2010.

In that same year, in September 2008, BSAT began the construction of ground facilities with digital-terrestrial broadcasting transformers and uplink facilities that were related to measures to use satellite for terrestrial digital broadcasting in poor reception areas. In November 2008 BSAT received a preliminary license for the broadcasting services related to these poor areas.

In December 2008 BSAT contracted Lockheed Martin to build and launch BSAT-3c/JCSAT-110R, jointly procured by B-SAT and SKY Perfect JSAT. The BSAT-3c was launched on August 7th 2011.

In January 2009 BSAT began the construction of the uplink facilities that were to be used in 2011.

From May 2009 till March 2010 the company studied and implemented countermeasures commissioned by liaison meeting on radio interference of some types of BS broadcasting reception systems.

In February 2010 BSAT began BS digital broadcasting services relating to measures for terrestrial digital broadcasting in poor reception areas and in December in the same year the BSAT-3b Satellite was put in operation.

In September 2011 the BSAT-3c Satellite was commissioned and in October that year BSAT began BS digital broadcasting services by new broadcasters using BS-5, 7, 11 and 19 channels.

In March 2012 the company began BS digital broadcasting services by new broadcasters using the BS-21 and 23 channels.

The BSAT-2a Satellite ceased operation in January 2012 and was de-orbited while the BSAT-2c Satellite was deorbited in July 2013.

 

References:


www.b-sat.co.jp
www.lockheedmartin.com
www.satbeams.com
www.orbitalatk.com



Satellites 

BSAT-1a (BSAT 1)

Orbital Position: 111° E
Manufacturer: Hughes Satellite Systems (Boeing Commercial Satellite Systems BCSS)
Launch date: 16 April 1997
Launch Operator: Arianespace
Launch vehicle: Ariane 44LP
Expected lifetime: 10 years

Note: Retired in 2007 and replaced by BSAT-3a Satellite. 

BSAT-1b (B-SAT 1B)

Orbital Position: 110° E
Manufacturer: Hughes Satellite Systems (Boeing Commercial Satellite Systems BCSS)
Launch date: 16 April 1997
Launch Operator: Arianespace
Launch vehicle: Ariane 44LP
Expected lifetime: 10 years

Note: The BSAT-1b Satellite was put in orbit as a back-up for the BSAT-1a satellite. The satellite was retired in 2007 and replaced by the BSAT-3a Satellite.

BSAT-2a (BSAT 2)

Orbital Position: 110° E
Manufacturer: Orbital Science Corp. (Orbital ATK, Inc)
Launch date: 8 Mar 2001
Launch Operator: Arianespace
Launch vehicle: Ariane 5G
Expected lifetime: 10 years

Note: Satellite was retired and de-orbited in January 2012.
 

BSAT-2b

Orbital Position: 110° E
Manufacturer: Orbital Science Corp. (Orbital ATK, Inc)
Launch date: July 2001
Launch Operator: Arianespace
Launch vehicle: Ariane 5G
Expected lifetime: 10 years

Note: Due to a launch failure the satellite was put is a useless oribital position.
 

BSAT-2c

Orbital Position: 110° E
Manufacturer: Orbital Science Corp. (Orbital ATK, Inc)
Launch date: 11 June 2003
Launch Operator: Arianespace
Launch vehicle: Ariane 5G
Expected lifetime: 10 years

Note: Satellite was de-orbited in July 2013.
 

BSAT-3a

Orbital Position: 110° E
Manufacturer: Lockheed Martin Space Systems
Launch date: 14 Aug 2007
Launch Operator: Arianespace
Launch vehicle: Ariane 5ECA
Expected lifetime: 13 years

Note: Satellite was replacing the BSAT-2 satellites that were retired.

BSAT-3b

Orbital Position: 110° E
Manufacturer: Lockheed Martin Space Systems
Launch date: 28 Oct 2010
Launch Operator: Arianespace
Launch vehicle: Ariane 5ECA
Expected lifetime: 15 years

BSAT-4a

Orbital Position: 110° E
Manufacturer: Space Systems/Loral (SS/L)
Launch date: 29 Sept 2017
Launch Operator: Arianespace
Launch vehicle: Ariane 5ECA
Expected lifetime: 15 years

Note: BSat-4a satellite will provide DTH services in Ultra-HD and 4K/8K to subscribers in Japan.

YouTube: Satellite will be launched in a dual launch with Intelsat's Intelsat-37e spacecraft. Watch the video of the launch, click here!