ChinaSat


China Satellite Communications Co. Ltd. (ChinaSat) operates 13 commercial satellites. ChinaSat is based in Bejing, China and is a core professional subsidiary of China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASC). 



History


During China’s reform period, satellite TV has had a more problematic history. Like cable, dynamic for its development, came as part of the 1983 reform. As part of the government’s overall project of providing television services to the entire nation, China Telecommunications Broadcast Satellite Corporation (ChinaSat) was formed under the Ministry of Radio, Film and Television.

In 1993 interdepartemental rivalry saw ChinaSat switch allegiances to the Minitry of Posts and Telecommunictions (ChinaSat 2000). Satellite TV technology is a potent expression of the post-Mao nation-building and modernization ideology of the government and the CCP. It’s capacity to bring television signals to the most remote areas and its use of extremely costly a sophisticated military-derived technologies of rocketry, telecommunication and computing make satellite and internationally visible demonstration of China’s emergence as a world power. The CCP gevernment’s pre-occupation with promoting this particular view of China’s nationhood and also maintaining its position as the China’s nation’s only legitimate representative, gave it a strong motivation to invest heavily in satellite technology in the 1980’s.

ChinaSat began in 1985 by leasing transponders on Intelsat, and purchased the aging Spacenet-1 in 1992. In 1988 China used its own rockets to launch two American-built Dongfang hong (The East is Red) satellites, so that by early 1990’s, China had begun to acquire significant satellite capability (ChinaSat 2000).

The finance available for developing and implementing satellite technology encouraged other Chinese ventures. As a result China Aerospace, the Defense, Science and Technology Commission, The People’s Bank of China and the Government of Shanghai formed SinoSat in 1994. SinoSat dominated the Chinese satellite market and used European satellite technology rather than American hardware. German industrial companies like Daimler Benz and Dornier show interest in the Chinese satellite industry.

The China Direct Broadcast Satellite Company operates the ChinaSat communications satellites. The series were previously operated by the China Satellite Communications Corporation, and before that the China Telecommunications Broadcast Satellite Corporation, which was owned by China's Ministry of Post and Telecommunications.

Satellites that were operated by the Sino Satellite Communications Company and the China Orient Telecommunications Satellite Company was renamed with ChinaSat designations following their mergers with the China Satellite Communications Corporation to form China DBSAT. ChinaStar-1 became ChinaSat-5A, Sinosat-1 became ChinaSat-5B, and Sinosat-3 became ChinaSat-5C.

Hong Kong based telecommunications companies were also active during this period; AsiaSat, a consortium of Chinese, Hong Kong and European telecommunications companies including the China International Trust & Investment Corporation, Hutchison Whampoa and UK based Cable & Wireless (AsiaSat 2000). In 1990 AsiaSat-1 satellite was launched by the group, which was China’s first commercial satellite.


ChinaSat enjoys the richest satellite resources in China. The Company has a professional team, outstanding system integration capacities and provides 24/7 quality services as well as integrated (space & terrestrial) satellite communications and broadcasting services.


References:

www.wikipedia.com
www.chinasat.com
www.satbeams.com
www.youtube.com
Media in China: Consumption, Content and Crisis by Mark Harrison



Satellites

ChinaSat-5D (ZX-5D)

Orbital Position: 52° E 
Manufacturer: Hughes Satellite Systems (Boeing CSS)
Launch date: 03 July 1996
Launch Operator: China Great Wall Industry Corporation (CGWIC)
Launch vehicle: Long March LM-3B/E
Expected lifetime: 10+ years

Note: Satellite is de-orbitted and EOL. 

ChinaSat-5A (ChinaStar-1, APSTAR-9A)

Orbital Position: 142° E 
Manufacturer: Lockheed Martin
Launch date: 30 May 1998
Launch Operator: China Great Wall Industry Corporation (CGWIC)
Launch vehicle: Long March LM-3B/E
Expected lifetime: 15 years

Note: The satellite was originally built for China Orient Telecommunicatons Co. and was transferred to ChinaSat after the merged in 2010. It was then renamed into ZX-5D. APT Satellite Company agreed with ChinaSat to lease the satellite awaiting the arrival of their APSTAR-9 spacecraft. APT renamed the ChinaSat-5D into APSTAR-9A.
 

ChinaSat-5C (SinoSat-3, Eutelsat-3A, Eutelsat 8 West D)

Orbital Position: 3° E (inclined)
Manufacturer: China Aerospace Science & Technology Corp. (CASC)
Launch date: 01 June 2007
Launch Operator: China Great Wall Industry Corporation (CGWIC)
Launch vehicle: Long March LM-3B/E
Expected lifetime: 15 years

Note: SinoSat-3 was transferred to ChinaSat after the merge and renamed in ChinaSat-5C. In 2011 Eutelsat leased the SinoSat-3 satellite to protect the orbital slot. It was moved to 1.6° East where it was renamed in Eutelsat-3A and later on in Eutelsat 8 West D.
 

ChinaSat-5E (ZX-5E, APSTAR-1)

Orbital Position: 163° E 
Manufacturer: Hughes Satellite Systems (Boeing CSS)
Launch date: 21 July 1994
Launch Operator: China Great Wall Industry Corporation (CGWIC)
Launch vehicle: Loung March LM-3B/E
Expected lifetime: 9 years

Note: Retired. In 2012 the APSTAR-1 satellite was renamed in ZX-5E).

APSTAR-5 (APSTAR-V, Telstar-18)

Orbital Postion: 138° E
Manufacturer: Space Systems/Loral (SS/L)
Launch date: 29 June 2004
Launch Operator: Sea Launch A.G.
Launch vehicle: Zenit 3SL
Expected life time: 13 years


Note: Telesat Canada owns Telstar-18 after the merge with Loral Space & Communications and is leasing capacity to APT Satellite that was formed by ChinaSat, and SingTel Singapore that are branding it under APSTAR-5 (APSTAR-V). APSTAR-5 replaced aging APSTAR-1.
 

APSTAR-6 (APSTAR-5B)

Orbital Position: 134° E 
Manufacturer: Thales Alenia Space
Launch date: 12 April 2005
Launch Operator: China Great Wall Industry Corporation (CGWIC)
Launch vehicle: Long March LM-3B/E
Expected lifetime: 15 years

ChinaSat-6B (SinoSat-6)

Orbital Position: 116° E 
Manufacturer: Thales Alenia Space
Launch date: 05 July 2007
Launch Operator: China Great Wall Industry Corporation (CGWIC) 
Launch vehicle: Long March LM-3B/E
Expected lifetime: 15 years

ChinaSat-9

Orbital Position: 93° E 
Manufacturer: Thales Alenia Space
Launch date: 09 June 2008
Launch Operator: China Great Wall Industry Corporation (CGWIC) 
Launch vehicle: Long March LM-3B/E
Expected lifetime: 15 years

ChinaSat-6A (SinoSat-6)

Orbital Position: 125° E 
Manufacturer: China Aerospace Science & Technology Corp. (CASC)
Launch date: 05 Sept 2010
Launch Operator: China Great Wall Industry Corporation (CGWIC) 
Launch vehicle: Long March LM-3B/E
Expected lifetime: 15 years

Note: After the launch the satellite developed a helium leakage which will cause a reduced lifetime.

Youtube: Check the ChinaSat-6A satellite launch
 

ChinaSat-10 (Zhongxing-10, ZX-10, SinoSat-5)

Orbital Position: 111° E 
Manufacturer: China Aerospace Science & Technology Corp. (CASC)
Launch date: 21 June 2011
Launch Operator: China Great Wall Industry Corporation (CGWIC)
Launch vehicle: Long March LM-3B/E
Expected lifetime: 15 years

APSTAR-7

Orbital Position: 77° E 
Manufacturer: Thales Alenia Space
Launch date: 31 Mar 2012
Launch Operator: China Great Wall Industry Corporation (CGWIC)
Launch vehicle: Long March LM-3B/E
Expected lifetime: 15 years

YouTube: Please watch the Apstar-7 satellite launch on Youtube! 

ChinaSat-12 (Apstar-7B, SupremeSat-1)

Orbital Position: 88° E 
Manufacturer: Thales Alenia Space
Launch date: 27 Nov 2012
Launch Operator: China Great Wall Industry Corporation (CGWIC)
Launch vehicle: Long March LM-3B/E
Expected lifetime: 15 years

Note: Sri Lanka Supreme Sat is leasing capacity and is co-branding it as Supremesat-1. The APSTAR-7B, originally a back-up for APSTAR-7, was contractually transferred from APT Satellite to ChinaSat in 2012.

YouTube: Please check the ChinaSat-12 satellite launch!
 

ChinaSat-11

Orbital Position: 98° E 
Manufacturer: China Aerospace Science & Technology Corp. (CASC)
Launch date: 02 May 2013
Launch Operator: China Great Wall Industry Corporation (CGWIC) 
Launch vehicle: Long March LM-3B/E
Expected life time: 15 years

YouTube: Please check the ChinaSat-11 satellite launch!

ChinaSat-15 (Zhongxing-15, ZX-15)

Orbital Position: 52° E 
Manufacturer: China Aerospace Science & Technology Corp. (CASC)
Launch date: 30 June 2016 (estimate)
Launch Operator: China Great Wall Industry Corporation (CGWIC)
Launch vehicle: Long March LM-3B/E
Expected lifetime: 15 years

Note: ChinaSat-15 was to be launched in 2014 and replace ChinaSat-5D.
 

ChinaSat-M (Zhongxing-M)

Orbital Position: 125° E 
Manufacturer: China Aerospace Science & Technology Corp. (CASC)
Launch date: 27 Dec 2016 (estimated)
Launch Operator: China Great Wall Industry Corporation (CGWIC) 
Launch vehicle: Long March LM-3B/E
Expected lifetime: 15 years

ChinaSat-16 (ZX-16)

Orbital Position: 111° E 
Manufacturer: China Aerospace Science & Technology Corp. (CASC)
Launch date: 2017 (estimate)
Launch Operator: China Great Wall Industry Corporation (CGWIC)
Launch vehicle: Long March LM-3B/G2
Expected lifetime: 15 years

Note: Ka-band satellite.