AsiaSat


Asia Satellite Telecommunications Co. Ltd. (AsiaSat) operates seven commercial satellites. AsiaSat is based in Hong Kong and as of 31 December 2016, the direct parent company, Bowenvale, Ltd, owns 74.43% shares of Asiasat. Bowenvale was jointly owned by China state owned CITIC, Ltd. and US-based private equity fund The Carlyle Group in a 50–50 ratio. Aberdeen Asset Management was the second largest shareholder for 5.99%.

AsiaSat, established in 1988 and has been Asia's premier regional satellite operator and is a dedicated pioneer in advancing satellite communications in Asia, headquartered in Hong Kong.

Being committed to offer customer-oriented, professional and proactive services, AsiaSat has achieved the market leader position and enjoyed industry recognition over the years, thus winning many sizable broadcasting and telecommunications enterprises, and governments' confidence to be their professional partner. With seven in-orbit satellites, Asiasat-2, Asiasat-3S and Asiasat-4, Asiasat-5 launched in 2005 to replace Asiasat-2, Asiasat-6, Asiasat-7, Asiasat-8 and in 2017 Asiasat-9 to replace Asiasat-4 billions of people around the world get accessed to information and communication channel through AsiaSat's services.

AsiaSat started with a single SCPC service on Asiasat-4 Ku-band in 2004 and has now grown to well over a full transponder worth of services throughout Australia.
Australia Satellite Communications (ASC) utilized Asiasat-4 for the Northern Territory Government iDirect Hub that was installed in Darwin to provide VSAT services throughout the Northern Territory for a variety of government agencies.

In 1999 AsiaSat co-invested in Speedcast, a ground-based satellite service provider, in a joint venture with serial entrepreneur Thomas Choi. The company was created in Hong Kong to allow content providers and information services to overcome the limited broadband infrastructure in the Asia-Pacific region. Utilizing existing C-band capacity on AsiaSat-3C, Speedcast built the needed hub in Hong Kong at the terminus of Broadband capacity on a trans-Pacific fiber optic cable and offers managed network satellite services in 30 countries in Asia, the Middle East and Africa.

In November 2007, AsiaSat purchased all outstanding shares to become 100% owner of Speedcast. Speedcast launched a diversity of satellite telecommunications service to customers over the course of the past 13 years.

In 2012 AsiaSat sold its SpeedCast satellite broadband subsidiary to private equity group, TA Associates of Boston, for 32.2 million USD. The sale was part of AsiaSat’s focus on its core business of selling satellite bandwidth.

TA completed a buyout of SpeedCast in September 2012 with a plan to execute a consolidation strategy in the Asia-Pacific satellite communications industry. The buyout of Pactel followed the December 2012 acquisition of Australian Satellite Communications (ASC), and the January 2013 buyout of Netherlands-based Elektrikom Satellite Service.

Speedcast has partnerships with SES, Inmarsat, Intelsat, Newtec, Telesat, Comtech EFData, iDirect, Eutelsat etc.


All trademarks, logos and images mentioned and showed on this page are property of their respective owners.


Resources

www.wikipedia.com
www.asiasat.com
www.ascs.com.au
www.wta.com
www.wiki2.org
www.asiasat.com
www.asx.com.au
www.sky-brokers.com
www.cloudscene.com
www.sspi.org 
www.satbeams.com
www.spacenews.com  edition October 1st, 2012
www.ta.com
www.speedcast.com



Satellites

AsiaSat-3S

Orbital Position: 120° E 
Manufacturer: Boeing Commercial Satellite Systems (BCSS)
Launch date: 21 Mar 1999
Launch Operator: International Launch Services (ILS)
Launch vehicle: Proton D1
Expected lifetime: 15 years

AsiaSat-4

Orbital Position: 122° E 
Manufacturer: Boeing Commercial Satellite Systems (BCSS)
Launch date: 11 April 2003
Launch Operator: United Launch Alliance (ULA)
Launch vehicle: Atlas IIIB
Expected lifetime: 15 years

AsiaSat-5

Orbital Position: 120° E 
Manufacturer: Space Systems/Loral (SS/L)
Launch date: 12 Aug 2009
Launch Operator: International Launch Services (ILS)
Launch vehicle: Proton K
Expected lifetime: 15 years

Please check the AsiaSat-5 satellite launch on Youtube! 

AsiaSat-7

Orbital Position: 106° E 
Manufacturer: Space Systems/Loral (SS/L)
Launch date: 26 Nov 2011
Lauch Operator: International Launch Services (ILS)
Launch vehicle: Proton Breeze
Expected lifetime: 15 years

Please check the AsiaSat-7 satellite launch on Youtube!
 

AsiaSat-6 (Thaicom-7)

Orbital Position: 120° E 
Manufacturer: Space Systems/Loral (SS/L)
Launch date: 07 Sept 2014
Launch Operator: SpaceX
Launch vehicle: Falcon 9
Expected lifetime: 15 years

Note: Thaicom agreed on the purchase of half capacity of the AsiaSat-6 satellite for 15 years.

Please check the AsiaSat-6 satellite launch on Youtube!
 

AsiaSat-8 (AMOS-7)

Orbital Position: 105° E 
Manufacturer: Space Systems/Loral (SS/L)
Launch date: 05 Aug 2014
Launch Operator: SpaceX
Launch vehicle: Falcon 9
Expected lifetime: 15 years

Note: Spacecom is leasing all Ku-band transponders on AsiaSat-8 after the loss of their AMOS-6 satellite caused by explosions on SpaceX Falcon-9 launch vehicle in 2016.

Please check the AsiaSat-8 satellite launch on Youtube!

AsiaSat-9

Orbital Position: 122° E 
Manufacturer: Space Systems/Loral (SS/L)
Launch date: 29 Sept 2017
Launch Operator: International Launch Services (ILS)
Launch vehicle: Proton M
Expected lifetime: 15 years

Note: The AsiaSat-9 satellite will provide additional capacity, enhanced power and coverage for Direct-to-Home (DTH), video distribution, private networks and broadband services to developing markets in Myanmar and countries across the Asia-Pacific region.

YouTube: Watch ILS launching the AsiaSat-9 spacecraft from the Baikonour launch site in Kazachstan.