Asia Broadcast Satellite



Asia Broadcast Satellite (ABS) operates 7 satellites in orbit. Beginning of 2016 the 8th spacecraft (ABS-2A) will be launched. ABS is headquartered in Bermuda.

Asia Broadcast Satellite is one of the fastest growing satellite operators in the world. ABS serves a global customer base with representatives in Asia, the Middle East, Europe and North America. ABS offers a complete range of End-to-End solutions including Direct to Home (DTH) and Cable TV distribution (CATV), Cellular Backhaul, VSAT and Internet Backbone services with diverse IP transit through its European and Asian internet gateways. ABS currently hosts over 175 TV channels making it as one of the fastest growing and top satellite distribution platforms and broadcaster of TV channels in the Asia Pacific.

ABS is rapidly expanding its satellite fleet and business worldwide through the recent acquisitions of ABS-7 (formerly Koreasat-3), ABS-1A (formerly Koreasat-2) and ABS-5 (formerly Agila-2). ABS has also completed a strategic cooperation with Eutelsat for the ABS-1B/W75 satellite at 75°E. In 2013 ABS launched their new state-of-the-art high-powered satellite, ABS-2 and is located at the 75° East Longitude, ABS' prime orbital location covering four-fifths of the world's population across the Indian Ocean region. 

On March 1st 2015 ABS successfully launched their ABS-3A that will be located at 3°W and connecting the Americas, Europe, Africa and the Middle East. It will extend ABS' C and Ku-band coverage into the Atlantic Ocean Region. Three C-band beams will cover the Americas, the Middle East and Africa along with a global beam. Four Ku-band beams will cover Europe, MENA, South Africa and the Americas.

Beginning of 2016 the ABS-2A satellite will be launched and will be co-located with ABS-2 at the prime location at 75°E. ABS is committed to maintaining its aggressive growth through the announcement of more strategic partnerships, acquisitions and further additions to its satellite fleet.




History


Asia Broadcast Satellite found its roots back in the 90’s. Mabuhay Philippines Satellite Company, MPSC (formerly Mabuhay Investment Corporation (MIC), a holding company owned by the Philippine Long Distance Telephone Company) was founded in November 1994. The company was established primarily to build, own, operate and maintain an international satellite providing telecommunications and broadcasting on a domestic and international level. It once owned the in 1999 launched Agila-2 (146°E), satellite, which provides the most powerful coverage in the Asia-Pacific region. Its control station is located at the MPSC Space Center in the Subic Bay Freeport Zone. 


Aside from satellite operation, it also provides satellite-related services. It currently operates two space centers, namely the Mabuhaysat Subic Space Center, its main hub, and the Mabuhaysat Zamboanga Space Center at Zamboanga City, its back-up hub.

The majority of the board of directors agreed, at a meeting held on April 10, 2003, to eliminate the word "Philippines" from the company's name, as the company was set to be the ideal satellite operator internationally, not only within the Philippines.

On November 6th 2009, MSC's communication satellite operation business was sold to Asia Broadcast Satellite (ABS) after they signed an agreement. ABS was established to meet the growing demands of broadcast and telecommunications operators in Africa, Russia, Asia and the Middle East regions. In September 2006, ABS successfully concluded the acquisition of the Lockheed Martin Intersputnik-1 (LMI-1) satellite that was renamed ABS-1 satellite.

In November 2010, the Permira funds and the ABS management team announced the successful acquisition of ABS from Citi Venture Capital International and Asia Debt Management.  ABS is majority owned by the Permira funds, which are advised by European Private Equity firm Permira. Historically the Permira funds have been a leading investor in the satellite industry with substantial ownership stakes in Intelsat and Inmarsat.

On January 13th, 2012 after the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) approved the amendment on its articles of incorporation, Mabuhay Satellite Corporation was renamed Mabuhay Investment Corporation.




References:

www.absatellite.net
www.sslmda.com
www.wta.com
www.satbeams.com
www.space.skyrocket.de
www.spacenews.com


Satellites

ABS-1A (Mugungwa-2, KoreaSat-2)

Orbital Position: 67° E (inclined)
Manufacturer: Lockheed Martin Space Systems
Launch date: 14 Jan 1996
Launch Operator: United Launch Alliance (ULA)
Launch vehicle: Delta II
Expected lifetime: 15 years

Note: ABS acquired Koreasat-2 satellite from Korea based KT Telecom in July 2009 and renamed it. The satellite has a reduced lifetime due to failure of rocket booster during launch.
 

ABS-3 (ABS-5, Mabuhay-1, ProtoStar III)

Orbital Position: 3° W
Manufacturer: Space Systems/Loral
Launch date: 19 Aug 1997
Launch Operator: China Great Wall Industry Corporation (CGWIC)
Launch vehicle: Long March CZ-3B/E
Expected lifetime: 15 years

Note: The satellite was originally built for Mabuhay Phillipines Satellite Corporation. After negotiations with US based ProtoStar to take the satellite over as ProtoStar-3 came to no conclusion, the satellite was acquired by Asia Broadcast Satellite and renamed Agila-2/ABS-5 in late 2009. In late 2011 it was repositioned to 3° West and renamed ABS-3.
 

ABS-7 (KoreaSat-3)

Orbital Position: 116° E
Manufacturer: Lockheed Martin Space Systems
Launch date: 4 Sept 1999
Launch Operator: Arianespace
Launch vehicle: Ariane 42P
Expected lifetime: 15 years

Note: ABS acquired the Koreasat-3 satellite from KT Telecom in 2010 and renamed it.
 

ABS-6 (LMI-1, KoreaSat-7, ABS-1)

Orbital Position: 159° E
Manufacturer: Lockheed Martin Space Systems
Launch date: 26 Sept 1999
Launch Operator: International Launch Services (ILS)
Launch vehicle: Proton K
Expected lifetime: 15 years

Note: ABS renamed ABS-1 to ABS-6 and KTSat is leasing capacity and is marketing this under KoreaSat-7.
 

ABS-4 (Mobisat-1, MBSat-1, ABS-2i)

Orbital Position: 61° E
Manufacturer: Space Systems/Loral
Launch date: 13 Mar 2004
Launch Operator: United Launch Alliance (ULA)
Launch vehicle: Atlas IIIA
Expected lifetime: 15 years

Note: Satellite was originally owned by Mobile Broadcasting Satellite (MBSat) to provide data & video at 120° W. The Broadcasting operations were stopped in March 2009 due to financial issues. Asia Broadcast purchased the satellite in 2013, moved it to 75°E and renamed in in ABS-2i. Later on it was renamed into ABS-4.
 

ABS-2 (ST-3, KoreaSat-8)

Orbital Position: 75° E
Manufacturer: Space Systems/Loral
Launch date: 06 Feb 2014
Launch Operator: Arianespace
Launch vehicle:  Ariane 5ECA
Expected lifetime: 15+ years

Note: In 2014 the Ku-band transponders failed.

Note: SingTel & KTSat are leasing transponders and are branding by using different names.
 

ABS-3A

Orbital Position: 3° W
Manufacturer: Boeing Commercial Satellite Systems (BCSS)
Launch date: 01 March 2015
Launch Operator: SpaceX
Launch vehicle: Falcon 9
Expected lifetime: 15 years

Note: Check how the ABS-3A satellite was launched on Youtube!
 

ABS-2A

Orbital Position: 75° E
Manufacturer: Boeing Commercial Satellite Systems (BCSS)
Launch date: 15 June 2016
Launch Operator: SpaceX
Launch vehicle: Falcon 9
Expected lifetime: 15 years

Note: ABS-2A satellite will be on a dual launch with Eutelsat's Eutelsat 117 West B (SATMEX-9) 

YouTube: Watch the ABS-2A dual launch with Eutelsat's EUTELSAT 117 West B satellite launch!
YouTube: Watch the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket that failed landing on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean